Month: September 2017

  • Saraswati, the Vedic Goddess and River

    One of the earliest goddesses worshipped in India since Vedic times, Saraswati devi, goddess of speech, wisdom, and expression, was believed to have found physical expression on earth also in the form of the ancient river Saraswati. The Rig Veda adores and praises this goddess as the 'best of all mothers', 'best of all rivers' and 'best of all goddesses' as Shruti Bakshi notes.

  • Ramana Maharshi on Birthdays

    Should we be happy to remember our birth day or sorry for it? These wise words of Sri Ramana Maharshi (or Bhagavan as he was called by his disciples), show a different perspective and make one think about whether being reborn into 'samsara' life should really be a celebration or rather be a reminder for us to enquire into our real nature.

  • YoseMIGHTY: A Storehouse of Natural Wonder

    Supriya Tandon shares her experience of a trip to the Yosemite National Park in California. The park is a treasure trove of the wonders of Mother Nature and Supriya even spots a rare 'rainbow in water'! Amidst the awesome natural beauty, one finds a deep contentment.

  • Navdurga: the 9 Forms of Durga

    The Navratri festival in India is a celebration of the nine nights of the Divine Mother. The Mother Goddess manifests in many different forms. In Hindu culture, each of the nine nights is associated with a particular form of the Mother Goddess, Durga or Shakti (Navdurga). Read more.

  • Ingredients of Myth-Making

    Ganesh Varadharajan explores what makes a work an 'epic'. Using as examples, Tolkien's 'Legendarium' and Martin's 'A Song of Ice & Fire', Ganesh brings out the different textures of the fantasy worlds created by the novelists. Referencing back to the great epics of Ramayana, Mahabharata, Sri Aurobindo's 'Savitri' as well as the Greek epics and the works of Shakespeare, gives an insight into the world of legend, myth and fantasy.

  • From the Immortals of Meluha to Immortal India – in conversation with Amish

    Shruti Bakshi speaks to bestselling author Amish Tripathi about a wide range of topics from his books to his writing process, to atheism in ancient India and current issues in India relating to religion, society and politics. As someone with vast knowledge about India's past and ancient wisdom and who refuses to be pigeonholed as 'left' or 'right', Amish's views are refreshing, insightful and enlightening.

  • When You Get Pushed Down From the Top of the World

    "The earth beneath my feet moved. I was going down and could not see any soil beneath my feet. It was white ice all around. I pressed my trekking shoes against the ice as hard as I could and managed to regain my balance. I took a moment to catch my breath and then went to the edge of the cliff to see what was going on..." Read more of the final part of the Everest Series in which Rohit Kumar finds that the awesome beauty of Mother Nature is enough to energise and lift one's spirits in the toughest moments.

  • Brahma’s Lie and the Delusion of Certainty

    "Brahma’s lie marks the first act of fundamentalism on the planet. The flower is punished for bearing witness and offering tacit support to the fundamentalist impulse. To claim a limited end to a limitless process, to reduce the infinite to the finite, to draw borders across the borderless, to make measurements of the unfathomable – this is the beginning of the human impulse to create certainty where none exists. It is the birth of pain, of suffering, of delusion." - Read more of the excerpt from the book Adiyogi: The Source of Yoga by Sadhguru Jaggi Vasudev.

  • Primal Divergence : A Contrast of Cultures (Part-4)

    The final part in this four-part series in which Ganesh Varadharajan contrasts Eastern and Western thought with a focus on pop-culture portrayals of the evolution and future of humanity. In this part, Ganesh explains The Mother's vision of the future of humanity and the role of the Supramental towards achieving it - something that appears to have inspired many Hollywood movie makers in recent times.